Loading...

Judges Don't Have To Contribute More For Health Care And Pensions, N.J. Supreme Court Rules

Loading...

NJ.com

User Profile You are signed in as

Loading...

Edit Public Profile Sign Out > comments

N.J. Supreme Court to decide whether to increase judges' health insurance, pension contributions

Print Email >MaryAnn Spoto | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com By MaryAnn Spoto | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com The Star-Ledger

Email the author | Follow on Twitter

on July 24, 2012 at 6:35 AM, updated July 24, 2012 at 10:58 AM

> comments
nj-chief-justice-stuart-rabner.JPGStar-Ledger file photoThe state Supreme Court is expected to issue this morning its highly anticipated ruling on whether New Jersey judges and justices have to pay more toward their pensions and health benefits or whether that extra cost is considered a reduction in salary.

UPDATE: Judges don't have to contribute more for health care and pensions, N.J. Supreme Court rules

TRENTON — The state Supreme Court is expected to issue this morning its highly anticipated ruling on whether New Jersey judges and justices have to pay more toward their pensions and health benefits or whether that extra cost is considered a reduction in salary.

The ruling addresses Gov. Chris Christie’s attempt to have state employees pay more into pension plans, which have been underfunded for decades, and for employees to pick up a greater share of their health care premiums.

While the higher contributions went into effect last year for most state employees, Superior Court Judge DePascale challenged the changes, saying they violate the state Constitution’s prohibition of “diminished” salaries for Superior Court judges and Supreme Court justices while they are in office.

The state Attorney General’s Office has argued the increased contributions are not a salary reduction but are a change in the benefits the jurists receive.

Superior Court Assignment Judge Linda Feinberg, who has since retired, ruled last fall the higher payments are salary cuts for the judges and justices. Bypassing the appellate division, the Supreme Court took up the case directly. That move prompted Christie, who accuse the court of making a rush to judge, to all the justices “unelected, unresponsive public servants” and “the exalted elite.”

That practice of bypassing is rare, but the state’s highest court is permitted to skip the Appellate Division when there are no major facts in dispute or when it believes the issue is a matter of important public interest.

The Supreme Court heard arguments on the issue on March 26.

Follow @NJ_News

Related coverage:

N.J. judge takes pension fight to state Supreme Court

N.J. Supreme Court to hear case on whether to increase judges' health insurance, pension contributions

Judge nixes Christie request to have N.J. judges contribute more toward pensions and benefits

Gov. Christie calls for constitutional amendment to bypass court's ruling on judges' pension contributions

>

Most Read

Find Local

Find a job

Buy or sell a car

Find a place to live

See what's for sale

Find a business

View obituaries

Have something to share?

>

    How to securely send a tip »

    Thank you for your subscription!

    To view and subscribe to any of our other newsletters, please click here.


    Trending Hairstyles

    Source : http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2012/07/nj_supreme_court_to_decide_whe_2.html

    N.J. Supreme Court to decide whether to increase judges' health insurance, pension contributions
    Part-time judges granted a £2bn pension payday... by fellow judges
    Electronic medical records are a burden or the future, depending on who you ask
    N.J. voters to decide if judges must pay more for pensions, health care
    The Murky Future for US Health Care
    Supreme Court to hear arguments on forced unionization for home-care families
    Gov. Snyder signs teacher pension law, will appeal court ruling on previous, mandated 3 percent contributions
    High court case could threaten union finances at public systems
    Supreme Court wrong on judges' pensions, benefits
    N.J. judge suing over rising pension, health care deductions is misguided