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Melbourne Watch Co Sorrento Watch Review

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One of the Niro’s main selling points is that it’s a hybrid but doesn’t look like one. In contrast to the Toyota Prius or Hyundai Ioniq, the crossover blends into the crowd while still providing 51.7 mpg in combined city and highway driving, according to our independent tests. It may not have the ungainly proportions and werewolf face of many electrified vehicles, but to what extent does it feel like a hybrid?

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Its 9.6-second saunter to 60 mph indicates that, like many economical hybrids, the Niro is not a quick vehicle. The electric motor kicks in to provide instant torque to get you moving, although this kind gesture is hampered by a transmission that performs clumsily at crawling speeds. The brakes also feel quintessentially hybrid, although they bite more than many. In our track tests, the Niro took 123 feet to come to a complete stop from 60 mph, ahead of the 2017 Prius Three and Ioniq, which required 126 feet and 133 feet, respectively. And although you’d imagine hybrid cars operating quietly, the Niro can get noisy when the gas engine kicks in.

But what bothers me more is how easily noise from the road seeps into the cabin. On a few recent long trips with the Niro, I realized it’s hard to hear other passengers while driving along the highway at 65 mph. On top of this, the Niro undulates with road imperfections, which makes it even noisier. Wind noise is reasonable but not terrific.

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